Tag Archives: Jones on F1

This is my heart signing off…

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This is it. The final word.

Wow! This is extremely hard for me to write even though many of you know what this is going to be, my final farewell.

I wrote in October that I have decided for the 2017 season that I will not be blogging on Jones on F1 for the 2017 Formula One season. For the 2017 season, I will be just focusing on writing for Driving For Pleasure and covering F1 and Formula E  with them as I have been for the last two years and properly giving it a full year of my attention to see if I can grow, develop it and build upon what I have already achieved there so far.

People now tend to know me as their F1 and Formula E (especially the latter) writer especially after receiving an FIA Accredition for my Formula E coverage after only writing about the series since February this year. But it is only fair that I give myself the opportunity to develop, grow and expand as a writer even further and repay the faith that Phil has shown in me for the last two years.

Ever since I announced this decision in October, I have nothing but positive comments about the decision and many people have been respectful and extremely supportive as always about this. Yet I have also had negative feedback as well; with many people wondering why I have taken this “rash” decision.

Well as I have previously stated, it’s been extremely hard for me to make this personal decision and this decision hasn’t been easy for me in the slightest, I’ve spent a lot of time, thought and even sleepless nights I have been thinking about it since March but gave myself time to consider this through to see if I would feel the same about it. But I still do.

I have and will be completely honest with each and everyone of you right here, right now. There’s many different reasons and factors that have contributed to me making this decision ranging from my current employment commitments, my commitments generally in my life and also events that have happened in my personal life this year especially that have made me step back and think about what I want to do, where my time, attention, care and focuses need to be on in my life and for my well-being right now.

And no matter how hard it might be for others to comprehend, understand or even acknowledge the decision that I have made regarding my writing commitments, all I ask is that you respect my decision which has I say hasn’t been easy to make at all.

I’ve had a great four years with the blog; words cannot be enough for what the blog has done for myself and also for my writing career as well. I’ve built the blog from absolutely nothing in October 2012 to now where the blog is now four years old, has now passed 31,000 website views and has reached over 2,000 blog posts.

This is something I could have never dreamed of when I started in 2012 and the best thing about the blog has been to share my passion for the fastest motorsport in the world that I’ve had since the age of seven years old. But the most important thing the blog has given me in the last four years is that I have gained experience and confidence with my writing and also as a person as well.

Over four brilliant years, I have made some great friends and colleagues that have become an important part in my blog’s journey. I would like to say a big thank you to my Promotional Partners Duurt and Etienne for believing in me 100% throughout this journey. I wouldn’t have gotten this far without you, you have shown me unconditional praise and support and I am proud to have had you both on this journey with me and have you as colleagues and friends as well.

To PSR and the PSR Family (you know who you are) who over the past three years helped me as a person and also as a journalist get my work out to a wider audience. I’ve had a ball and long may the laughs continue as well.

I would like to say a huge thank you to the F1 Family on Twitter who have followed me since the early days of the blog and have supported me since with their support. Without you guys, I wouldn’t have ever achieved this and you guys are the best family on Twitter.

Without getting emotional here, I would like to say thank you to my partner in crime Sarah, Paul, Jon, Ben, Lois and Courtney for being the best friends and fellow F1 fans that I could dream of. Each of you individually have helped inspire, promote, encourage, support the blog in your own ways but more importantly without this blog, being fellow fans and PSR, we wouldn’t even be friends. I thank the stars that I found each of you and words can’t say how much I love you all.

I cannot miss out my editor Phil at Driving For Pleasure. Phil has been absolutely nothing but brilliant since we began working together and despite me always being at work most weekends when Formula One and Formula E is on television, he has supported me in the work I do for him but also for this blog and has done everything in his power to help me continue my writing. So Thank you Phil and here’s to the future together.

Finally, the last of my thank you messages go out to my friends and family. You know who are you and I’m blessed to have your support and encouragement in everything I do in my life. Including this, a pipedream that has achieved so much. You are my world, my rocks, my life- thank you.

But that’s not to say that I won’t ever blog on Jones On F1 again in the near future. I might blog every now and then, just not as frequently as the last four years. But I do now think the time is right for me right now as a Formula One and Formula E writer to see if I can push D4P to be the best it can be with my full attention and commitment for at least a year.

But that’s it everyone. I will do a Twitcam to say a fond goodbye to the blog within the next week. I will be forever grateful to everyone who has read, support and promoted Jones on F1  during the 4 years I’ve been doing the blog.

I couldn’t have asked for better people to help me on this journey I’ve been on. And I hope you will be there for the next stage of my journey by following my Formula 1 and Formula E coverage on Driving For Pleasure from the 29th November 2016 and beyond.

Sarah

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Jones on F1 reaches 2,000th blog post

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When I started #JonesonF1 in October 2012, I never thought I would reach 100 blog posts, never mind reaching 500, 1,000 or 1,500 never mind 2,000 blog posts and I cannot believe that it has happened before the end of the year and before I commit my 2017 season to Driving For Pleasure.

On achieving 2,000 posts with #JonesonF1, I have to thank everyone who has made it possible for me to achieve this milestone. I have to thank firstly every member of the #F1Family and every #F1 fan that have followed and shared links to the blog from its early days as McLaren F1 Messiah on Twitter. You guys really are truly the best and welcoming family on Twitter!

A big massive thank you goes out to my #JonesonF1 Promotional Partners who are my #MsportXtra partner Duurt (You can follow Duurt on Twitter @MsportExtra), my #F1LiveStream partner Etienne (You can follow Etienne on Twitter @Etienne_Dokkum), my amazing and truly awesome and the best partner-in-crime ever Sarah (who runs #F1POTD with @F1_Fans_Updates who I meant via Pit Stop Radio @PitStopRadio), the awesome one that is Paul (You can follow Paul on Twitter @Paul11MSport), my favourite Mancunian Ben (You can follow Ben on Twitter @BenIssatt) and also to my PSR panel buddy Jon (You can follow Jon on Twitter @jonharber).

From the bottom of my heart, I cannot thank you each of you enough for your personal support and also I am so honoured for #JonesonF1 to be one of your promotional partners. I would like to thank you all for believing in me, helping me settle into the #MsportXtra, #F1LiveStream, PSR and F1 Family and also supporting #JonesonF1 for giving me with fantastic opportunity to become a partner with each of you and also for becoming very close friends along the way.

I would also like to thank the following people:-

  • The PSR Family- Thank you so much for welcoming into PSR and making me feel part of the family since I joined. We may not talk often due to the pressures of life but thanks for being an epic second family
  • Thank you to Phil from Driving for Pleasure for giving me the opportunity to write Formula One coverage for their website. I thank you so much for your support and giving me the chance to write for your amazing website and I hope to continue our partnership in the near future.

And finally, I cannot thank my amazing family and friends enough for all their support since starting the blog. A special thanks especially goes to Ste who has lent me his laptop whenever I need it during the course of this journey in exchange for being fed steak (Yes Ste, I said steak!). Without their support and encouragement I receive from them, I would not be where I am with the blog today and I am forever indebted to each and every one of you for supporting and believing in me and the blog.

So thank you so much; words will never express how grateful and humbled I am to reach this milestone and also for your support.

Sarah

Jones on F1 2017 announcement

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This is extremely hard for me to write and it’s been extremely hard for me to make this personal decision as well. This decision hasn’t been easy for me in the slightest, I’ve spent a lot of time, thought and even sleepless nights I have been thinking about it since  March but gave myself time to consider this through to see if I would feel the same about it. But I still do.

And I’ve come to a difficult and heartbreaking decision that at the end of the season, I won’t be blogging on Jones on F1 for the 2017 Formula One season. Yeah… I’ve just said that. Wow!

For the 2017 season, I will be just focusing on writing for Driving For Pleasure and covering F1 and Formula E  with them as I have been for the last two years and properly giving it a full year of my attention to see if I can grow, develop it and build upon what I have already achieved there so far.

Many of you are probably wondering or will be asking why am I not blogging on Jones on F1 for the 2017 season? I will be completely honest with each and everyone of you right here, right now; there’s many different reasons and factors that have contributed to me making this decision ranging from my current employment commitments, my commitments and events that have happened in my personal life this year especially and also my current health situation at the moment as well that have made me step back and think about what I want to do, where my time, attention, care and focuses need to be on in my life and for my well-being right now.

Before anyone tries to even ask me to justify more about these factors and seeing if I can balance everything that is going on right now in my life; I will only say that my current situation cannot go on and something has got to be shelved in order for me to take a step back to allow myself to pursue and focus on what right now matters in my life and for my health and well-being.

And no matter how hard it might be for others to comprehend, understand or even acknowledge the decision that I have made regarding my writing commitments, all I ask is that you respect my decision which has I say hasn’t been easy to make at all.

I’ve had a great four years with the blog; words cannot be enough for what the blog has done for myself and also for my writing career as well. I’ve built the blog from absolutely nothing in October 2012 to now where the blog reaches its fourth birthday on the 25th October, has now passed 30,000 website views and on track to reach 2,000 posts by November.

The best thing about the blog has been to share my passion for the fastest motorsport in the world that I’ve had since the age of seven years old. But the most important thing the blog has given me in the last four years is that I have gained experience and confidence with my writing and also as a person as well.

I have made some great friends and colleagues that have become an important part in my blog’s journey (Especially the PSR Family) and also personally as well in my life, been approached by many amazing publications who have expressed an interest in my work and wanting me to become a part of them and gained some amazing Promotional Partners along the way (Especially Duurt).

That’s not to say that I won’t ever blog on Jones On F1 again in the near future. I might blog every now and then, just not as frequently as the last four years. But I do now think the time is right for me as a writer to see if I can push D4P to be the best it can be with my full attention and commitment for at least a year.

People tend to know me as their F1 and Formula E (especially the latter) writer especially after receiving an FIA Accredition for my Formula E coverage after only writing about the series since February this year. But it is only fair that I give myself the opportunity to develop, grow and expand as a writer even further and repay the faith that Phil has shown in me for the last two years.

But until the 27th November, I’m carrying on as normal until the end of the season with the blog and D4P, will be celebrating the blog’s fourth birthday on the 25th October and hopefully I’ll have 2,000 posts under my belt at the end of the season and I will do a Twitcam to say a fond goodbye to the blog.

I will be forever grateful to you and everyone else for everything during the 4 years I’ve been doing the blog, I couldn’t have asked for better people to help me on this journey I’ve been on. And I hope you will be there for the next stage of my journey by following my Formula 1 and Formula E coverage on Driving For Pleasure from the 28th November 2016 and beyond.

Sarah

Jones on F1 Iconic F1 Cars: The Jordan 191

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In a brand new monthly feature, Jones on F1 will be looking at some iconic Formula One cars that have shaped the sport into the way it is now. Be it for the iconic car being beautiful, successful on the track, being ground-breaking or just being well loved and respected for any motorsport fan.

So here’s to the first Jones on F1 iconic F1 car… the Jordan 191.

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With Team Owner Eddie Jordan being a successful racer himself,  Jordan was forced to switch to a role as entrant at the end of the 1970s after his funds had dried up. Combining his keen eye for young talent and business savvy, Jordan’s team gradually moved up the ranks during the 1980s.

Among the drivers that raced for Eddie Jordan Racing in this period were Johnny Herbert, Jean Alesi, Martin Donnelly and Eddie Irvine. By establishing Jordan Grand Prix and subsequently entering Formula 1 in 1991, Jordan made the final step up the ladder.

Stepping up to F1 meant a fundamental change for Jordan as he no longer could rely on cars produced by others and would have to build his own cars. The task of designing the very first ‘Jordan’ was assigned to Gary Anderson. This was a logical step as Jordan’s most recent successes in F3000 were with Reynards that had also been the work of Anderson. To build and run the new F1 cars, Jordan Grand Prix set up shop right across the main entry gate of the Silverstone circuit.

First pictures of the Jordan 191 in 1990 which was then known as the Jordan 911.

First pictures of the Jordan 191 in 1990 which was then known as the Jordan 911.

In 1990, The Jordan 911 was launched to the media and famed French journalist Jabby Crombac writing ‘why are they bothering?’. But a few weeks later Jordan received a letter from Stuttgart.  It was written in German, with some red ink to show that it was serious. EJ’s general manager, the late Bosco Quinn whose memorial plaque stands on the side of the Force India factory, needed help translate it and he got the help from Mark Gallagher (who would shape part of Jordan’s history in the sport).

But the problem was clear.  Porsche was unhappy that Jordan had called our car the 911.  This, of course, hadn’t occurred to Jordan for a number of reasons, not least because the team called it the ninety one one, whereas they were calling it the nine eleven.

The upshot of this, and subsequent letters, was that Jordan headed off for a meeting at Porsche Cars GB where he walked into a room full of corporate executives and lawyers rather concerned about Jordan’s breach of their rights to any car designated ‘911’.

The result of this meeting was an instruction from the team had to ‘change everything’.  This meant Jordan undertaking not to use the term ‘911’ in any further press releases and paying for a couple of new stickers for the car.  Cost?  £25 in all reality.  And the Jordan team simply altered the sequence of numbers so that, from then on, the car became a 191.

All rights reserved to F1 Fanatic.

All rights reserved to F1 Fanatic.

Anderson penned his first F1 car very much along conventional lines. As was the norm by the early 1990s, the monocoque chassis was constructed from carbon-fibre. Suspension was by double wishbones and push-rod actuated dampers and springs on all four corners. The relatively narrow cockpit allowed for a very clean body with low side-pods. One of the more unusual features of Anderson’s design was the front wing that extend beyond the raised nose.

To power the new ‘Jordan 191’, the fledgling manufacturer turned to Ford and its long time engine partner Cosworth. The Blue Oval’s ‘HB’ V8 was reliable and relatively affordable option although not quite as powerful as the V10 and V12 engines used by the top teams. Displacing just under the 3.5 litre limit, it produced around 670 bhp in its latest ‘series 4’ trim. The compact V8 was mated to a transversely mounted, six-speed gearbox, which used Hewland sourced internals.

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The first man to drive a Jordan Formula 1 car was British veteran John Watson, who had already driven for Jordan earlier in his career. Eventually, the team settled for the experienced Andrea de Cesaris and talented Belgian Bertrand Gachot to drive the Ford-powered 191 in its debut season. After a difficult start to the year, the two drivers placed fourth and fifth in the Canadian Grand Prix, earning Jordan Grand Prix’ first points in only its fifth race.

Belgian GP 1991

Michael Schumacher driving for Jordan GP at the Belgian GP 1991

The Jordan 191’s main claim to fame came at the Belgian Grand Prix where a young German driver was hired to replace Gachot, who had to serve a two-month prison sentence for assaulting a cab driver. This talented substitute was none other than Michael Schumacher, who came with a $150,000 bonus from his employer Mercedes-Benz to build up experience. He qualified a spectacular seventh but was forced to retire with a clutch problem early in the first lap of the race.

Jordan’s hopes to retain Schumacher for the rest of the season were dashed as despite a verbal agreement, the young German was recruited by Benetton for the next round. His seat was first taken by Roberto Moreno, who had been ousted by Benetton to make way for Schumacher and later by Alessandro Zanardi. Although Gachot was available for the final two rounds of the season, Jordan opted to stick with his existing driver line-up.

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Although best remembered for giving Schumacher his break in Formula 1, the Jordan 191 deserves more credit. De Cesaris had a solid season that saw him finish 9th in the championship. Gachot and Moreno also scored points and the combined tally was enough for Jordan Grand Prix to finish 5th in the constructor’s standings in the team’s debut season, ahead of seasoned teams like Lotus, Tyrrell and Brabham.

Despite the formidable debut season, Jordan Grand Prix lost their deal with Ford for 1992 and instead had to turn to the considerably cheaper but also hopelessly unreliable and longer Yamaha OX99 V10. This came at the expense of success and in their second year only a single point was scored. The slump in performance would fortunately only prove temporary.

Classic #jonesonf1; The 2003 British Grand Prix

The most iconic picture of the 2003 British GP.

The most iconic picture of the 2003 British GP.

The British Grand Prix: Round 11 of 16 in the 2003 Formula One World Championship. Heading into the race, Ferrari driver Michael Schumacher led the Driver’s Championship by 64 points ahead of McLaren-Mercedes driver Kimi Raikkonen in second place with 56 points and ahead of Williams-BMW driver Ralf Schumacher in third place with 53 points.

Rubens Barrichello claims Pole Position for the 2003 British GP.

Rubens Barrichello claims Pole Position for the 2003 British GP.

In Qualifying, Rubens Barrichello claimed Pole Position for the 2003 British Grand Prix ahead of Renault driver Jarno Trulli in second place and McLaren-Mercedes driver Kimi Raikkonen in third place. Barrichello’s Pole Position was additionally bizarre as he was the second car to run on Saturday, having dropped the ball in a most unfortunate fashion on Friday, which left him with no time registered.

It is rare indeed in the sport that a time set in the opening minutes of qualifying survives being quickest all the way through the session. But the winds of Northampton were blowing when Rubens was out but as the session went on they blew more and changed direction minute by minute making it impossible for the teams to predict what was going to happen.

Williams-BMW driver Ralf Schumacher qualified in fourth place ahead of his brother Michael Schumacher in fifth place, Cristiano Da Matta in sixth place, Juan-Pablo Montoya in seventh place, Fernando Alonso in eighth place, Jacques Villeneuve in ninth place and Antonio Pizzonia who rounded off the top ten finishers.

The start of the 2003 British GP.

The start of the 2003 British GP.

On Race Day on Sunday, the race began with Barrichello starting from Pole Position ahead of Trulli and Raikkonen. But Barrichello made a poor start which allowed both Trulli and Räikkönen past on an incident-free first lap as Ralf and Michael Schumacher retained their starting positions of fourth and fifth.

On the sixth lap, the headrest of David Coulthard dislodged while traversing the first corner (Copse), forcing him to the pits for a replacement under safety regulations, and causing a Safety Car period to allow marshals to clear the track. Upon the resumption of green flag racing, Barrichello closed the gap to Räikkönen before passing him on lap 11.

Neil Horan invading the track on Lap 11 of the 2003 British GP.

Neil Horan invading the track on Lap 11 of the 2003 British GP.

On the following lap, Neil Horan invaded the circuit and another safety car period was necessitated. As it was close to the period when the drivers would be making their scheduled pit stops, the vast majority of cars decided to pit under the safety car. The second placed cars from the respective teams were forced to queue up in the pit lane waiting for service, causing them to drop many places. Michael Schumacher, Fernando Alonso and Juan Pablo were all outside of the top ten.

Cristiano da Matta leading the British GP on Lap 12.

Cristiano da Matta leading the British GP on Lap 12.

Of the leading contenders, Trulli was in fourth place while both Räikkönen and Ralf Schumacher had jumped Barrichello when in the pits. But the Toyotas of Cristiano da Matta and Olivier Panis opted not to pit and was leading the race ahead of Coulthard in third place having not required a pit stop after his earlier unscheduled headrest replacement.

Räikkönen passed Trulli immediately after the restart before clearing team-mate Coulthard on the same lap. Barrichello then passed a slowing Ralf Schumacher on Lap 17 while Räikkönen also passed Panis before chasing down the leading da Matta.

Ralf Schumacher was forced to pit after encountering difficulties, while at the same time Michael Schumacher was unable to pass Alonso. By Lap 26, Barrichello was still trying to pass Trulli, and the two leaders continued to extend their lead. Barrichello and Montoya eventually passed Trulli by the end of Lap 27, before Panis fell victim to both on Lap 29.

Da Matta eventually ceded the lead after pitting on Lap 30 to Räikkönen. Barrichello then set the fastest lap after being cleared of traffic, taking the lead after Räikkönen pitted for the second time. Barrichello continued to cut the advantage, but Räikkönen regained the lead with a reduced margin following the Brazilian’s second stop.

Rubens Barrichello passing Kimi Raikkonen for the lead of the 2003 British GP on Lap 46.

Rubens Barrichello passing Kimi Raikkonen for the lead of the 2003 British GP on Lap 46.

After closing in, Barrichello passed Räikkönen after pressuring him into a mistake. Michael Schumacher eventually passed Trulli on Lap 46, but an unforced error by Räikkönen allowed Montoya to seize second position. In the closing phase of the race, Coulthard passed both da Matta and Trulli to earn fifth place.

Rubens Barrichello wins the 2003 British GP ahead of Juan Pablo Montoya in second place and Kimi Raikkonen in third place.

Rubens Barrichello wins the 2003 British GP ahead of Juan Pablo Montoya in second place and Kimi Raikkonen in third place.

But it was Rubens Barrichello who won the 2003 British Grand Prix ahead of Juan Pablo Montoya in second place and Kimi Raikkonen in third place. Michael Schumacher finished the race in fourth place ahead of David Coulthard in fifth place, Jarno Trulli in sixth place, Cristiano da Matta in seventh place, Jenson Button in eighth place, Ralf Schumacher in ninth place and Jacques Villeneuve rounding off the top ten finishers.

The 2003 British Grand Prix will always be remembered as the race that Neil Horan invaded the Silverstone circuit on Lap 11 on the Hangar straight after clearing the fence wearing a kilt, waving banners with statements “Read the bible” and “The Bible is always right” and ran towards the sequence of cars, forcing several cars to swerve to avoid him.

Horan eventually returned to the grass runoff area at the side of the track after the cars had passed for the lap, and was stopped by a track marshal. He was later charged with aggravated trespass and pleaded guilty in a Northampton court stating that he took the open gate as a sign from God although the prosecution contended that his act was premeditated as he had already prepared the banners prior to attending the Grand Prix. He was later jailed for two months.

It will be also remembered by fans that it was a great race overall with regards to action on the track which was going on throughout the field and you couldn’t take your eyes off it. And I still couldn’t when I re-watched the race from start to finish to write this review!

But let us not forget that this was Antonio Pizzonia’s last race of the season. He was dropped due to a string of poor results, and replaced by Minardi’s Justin Wilson who was then replaced by Danish driver Nicolas Kiesa at Minardi.

And as the 2003 World Championship continued at the Hockenheim circuit in Germany, Schumacher still lead the Driver’s Championship with 69 points ahead of Raikkonen with 62 points and Montoya in third place with 55 points.

Competition time: Jones on F1 celebrates three years of blogging

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To celebrate Jones on F1’s third birthday today,  I have a copy of Senna Versus Prost to give away to one lucky person to add to their F1 book collection (If you have one like myself or just interested in learning more about the most famous rivalry in motorsport).

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In order for your chance to win this copy of this great book, you need to answer the following question:-

Q:- In what year did Senna and Prost collide on the final corner of the Japanese GP in Suzuka?

A: 1988

B: 1990

C: 1989

Please use the contact form above to answer the question by stating your name, your email, your Twitter username (if you have Twitter) and your answer to the question in the comment box by Sunday 1st November at midday. The winner will be picked on Sunday 1st November at 5pm and will be notified via email and also on Twitter.

But good luck to everyone who will be entering the competition and thanks again for supporting #JonesonF1 reach this amazing milestone.

Happy 3rd birthday to Jones on F1!

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The 25th October 2012; the first time Jones on F1 published its first article and made its first steps into the F1 Blogging world. Now three years later, never did I imagine in my wildest dreams that Jones on F1 would reach its first birthday; never mind its third birthday!

But what a journey it has been. Jones on F1 has gone from taking its first steps in October 2012 to now in October 2015 growing beyond my expectations. This has seen the blog not only gain momentum, respectability, an amazing group of regular followers, having the chance to speak at events about my passion for the sport in my home town of Liverpool, reaching over 22,000 website views and over and also over 1,400 blog posts.

This also alongside acquiring the best Promotional Partners I could wish for; but it has also given me the chance to write for other websites alongside this and gain more further media access to the sport that I love more passionately than ever.

A big thank you firstly goes out to my amazing Promotional Partners who are Duurt (@MsportXtra), Etienne (@EtienneDokkum), Sarah (@F1_Fans_Updates and also Pit Stop Radio (@PitStopRadio), Paul, Ben and Jon. You guys are the best partners I could have and thank you for everything you’ve done for the blog and also for myself personally as frinds; wouldn’t be where I am without you and long may our partnerships continue!

Big thanks to my editor Phil at Driving for Pleasure for giving me the chance to write the F1 coverage for the website. Its been great working with you and thank you for being so understanding around my work commitments and long may our partnership continue.

I would also like to say a big thank you to the Pit Stop Radio family and the Pure F1 Family (you know you are) for welcoming me into your world and just allowing me to be myself while talking about one of my great passions in life and become some of my good friends; you guys rock!

Another thank you goes out to everyone I’ve worked with along the way especially everyone at Read Motorsport (formally Formula Update). You gave me a chance to write for you guys, gain further media access and also the confidence to improve as a writer and I’m grateful for what you did for me during the time I worked with you all.

I cannot forget the F1 Family on Twitter especially some of you who have supported Jones on F1 from its beginnings as McLaren F1 Messiah. You gave me the confidence to branch out, interact with other members of the family on Twitter and just be myself which I thank you all for.

And finally, a big thank you to my friends and family for everything. I know I drive you mad when I’m writing or discussing with you about F1 and you all know nothing about it. But you’ve given me the confidence, belief and the drive to actually keep with the blog when at times I wanted to give up and I’m glad you talked me around. You guys are my world and I love you all so much.

So all that’s left to say is Jones on F1 is now officially three years old and is growing and improving all the time; long may that continue and I can break even more of my own expectations that I had three years ago when I created this blog. The only way is up!

Sarah